Immortal Dialogue: Films E – H

The Green Slime (1968):

Theme-song (extended version):

Open the door, you’ll find the secret
To find the answer is to keep it
You’ll believe it when you find
Somethin’ screamin’ ‘cross your mind
Green sli-ii-ime!

What could it be, what is the reason?
Is this the end to all that breathes, and
Is it just something in your head?
Will you believe it when you’re dead?
Green sli-ii-ime!

Man has looked out to space in wonder
For thousands of years
Sometimes thinking that life could be somewhere
And now—now it’s HERE!

Green slime!

What could it be, what is the reason?
Is this the end to all that breathes, and
Is it just something in your head?
Will you believe it when you’re dead?
Green sli-ii-ime!
Gre-ee-en sli-ii-ii-ime!
Gre-ee-en sli-ii-ii-ii-ime!
Green slime!

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Half Human (1958):

First scientist:  The gruesome deaths of my two assistants was the first in a series of horrible events that would lead to the discovery of the answer to one of the great mysteries of anthropology!
Second scientist:
  Let’s get back to the searching party! I want to know—did they ever find what left those footprints in the snow?
First scientist [chuckling]:
  You haven’t changed a bit, Alan! You’re just the same as the day I left the States!—combination detective and scientist! But to answer your question—no, they didn’t.

First scientist:  Some time afterwards, a scientist who was researching the hair follicle came to the conclusion that it could signify only one thing: the unknown species’ body was completely covered with hair.
Second scientist:
  You mean they reached their conclusion because the subcutaneous tissue found resembled the tissue found on the hair follicle of a bear or an ape?
Third scientist:
  Wait a minute! John, I thought you said earlier that you couldn’t classify the hair, and that you’d ruled out the possibility of it being a member of the monkey family or a bear?
First scientist:
  That’s true, Alan! The hair was something none of us had seen before; but the subcutaneous tissue, which was also foreign to us too, nevertheless had enough similarities to the cellular hair structure of the monkey family for us to accept the findings of the laboratory technicians as accurate.
Second scientist:
  How finally did you find the exact hair classification?
First scientist:
  Well, actually, we didn’t. Oh, we all had our theories, but—the theories didn’t stand scrutiny. After weeks and weeks we finally came to the conclusion that we were up against an impenetrable stone wall!

Scientist:  Professor Tanaka is one of the most brilliant men in the entire field of anthropology. I’ve read everything he’s ever published. Sometimes his methods and deductions startle me, but his approach to theory is close to pure genius!

First scientist:  He was convinced in his mind that the hair follicle was closer to that of man than that of any other animal known to exist. Based upon that he concluded that this unknown species might very well be a combination of man and animal.
Second scientist:
  Oh, no! Don’t tell me he suggested the Neanderthal man!

First scientist:  A strange mountain people! The boy was the first civilised human they’d ever seen or encountered.
Second scientist:
  But you said earlier that this region Professor Tanaka was exploring was uninhabited.
First scientist:
  Well, we believed it was uninhabited because it was uncharted.
Third scientist:
  Were these people you refer to—savages?
First scientist:
  Not to the point of eating their own dead.

First scientist:  John – ! I know, I know: you said you didn’t want to discuss the Snowman’s behaviour or his emotional capacities until later, but— Frankly, with all you’ve told us, I find myself getting more and more puzzled.
Second scientist:
  I think I know what Alan’s driving at—and I’m a little curious too. When we were introduced to the Snowman he was a vicious killer. He killed two men. But when he saw the girl asleep in the tent, he displayed a gentle tenderness. Then the mountain girl was the only person allowed to enter his cave. I began to speculate that he found women attractive! – that his thought patterns set them apart. [chuckles] But when he saved the boy’s life I was completely baffled!
First scientist:
 
Why, that’s it, Professor! I think his instincts are quite apparent.  But I really had the feeling that this monster was capable of thought patterns!

Doctor:  It’s simply fantastic! If I hadn’t performed the surgery myself, I wouldn’t have believed it.
Scientist:
  What did you find, Carl?
Doctor:
  One half of the skull vault is formed exactly like that of a normal human being; the other half is animal-like. The respiratory system is almost identical to ours—as are the lungs!

First scientist:  How different did you find the nervous system?
Doctor:
  It’s as complex as ours, but—much smaller.
Second scientist:
  Would you say that over a period of 200,000 years, this species’ system, as it grew, might slowly evolve into man?
Doctor:
  It might not take anything like 200,000 years. If we could control the animal part of his brain, and effectively treat his glands— Well, I should say that, in that event, in perhaps ten or fifteen generations, you could develop a species that might be able to speak a single sentence.

First scientist:  Carl, would you say at maturity that he would develop behaviour patterns?—or do you think it’s safer to say, just an occasional instinct?
Doctor:
  From what I’ve seen, I’d say both.

First scientist:  Would he be able to differentiate between male and female?
Doctor:
  Yes, I would think so.
Second scientist:
  Would he have a marked preference?
Doctor:
  Oh, why not? After all, his anatomy, at maturity, will be almost human.

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